非漂 [Fēi Piāo] November 2016 Newsbriefs

guangzhous-little-africaHard times for Africans in Guangzhou amid crackdown. Complains one resident of ‘Little Africa’: It seems they want the Africans to leave this area . . . every month now, I have to go to the police station [to register], every month. I feel like I’m in jail.

The judging panel for the 2016 Etisalat Prize for Literature has announced the 2016 longlist of nine books: Mr. and Mrs. Doctor by Julie Iromuanya; The Yearning by Mohale Mashigo; Piggy Boy’s Blues by Nakhane Toure; The Peculiars by Jen Thorpe; Born on a Tuesday by Elnathan John; And After Many Days by Jowhor Ile; Dub Steps by Andrew Miller; The Seed Thief by Jacqui L’Ange, and Nwezelenga: The Star Child by Unathi Magubeni. The winner will be announced in March 2017 and will receive £15,000.

Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino, which celebrated its 50th anniversary with a song-of-lawinogrand celebration at Makerere University early this year, is being translated into Sheng. Sheng is a Swahili and English-based creole that has spread across social classes and geographically to neighbouring Tanzania and Uganda. Many youth living in the Nairobi use the argot as their everyday mode of communication rather than Swahili or English.

 

Ethiopia’s internet is among the least free in the world, ranking ahead of only Iran, Syria, and China out of the 65 countries surveyed.

蒙古帝国为什么没有统治非洲?

Attention: Ce taxi contient un livre. Taxis in Tunis are taking part in an online literary initiative launched by online book-sharing platform YallaRead (“Come on, Read” in Arabic).

Chinese Literature in Africa: Meaningful or Simply Ceremonial? 

Interview with Louise Umutoni, founder and director of Rwanda’s Huza Press. Winner of The Huza Prize for Fiction — short story submissions accepted through end November — will be awarded US$1,000.

Magunga.com: Fledgling Online Pan-African Bookstore

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] Quote of the Week: Better Ignorant than Misinformed

“. . . a society is best when it is fully and truly informed, otherwise an uninformed society is better than a misinformed one.”

(Dr Negeri Lencho, Ethiopia’s new Minister of Government Communication Affairs, speaking in a 2013 interview)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] October 2016 Newsbriefs

season-of-crimson-blossoms欢迎访问关注非漂 [Fēi Piāo]新设的微博,liberation 时代

Season of Crimson Blossoms, a novel by Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, wins the 2016 Nigeria Prize for Literature, worth US$100,000. Writes author and critic Toni Kan: I was fascinated because I grew up in the North, first Kano and then Jos, but I was discovering something new about the North in Abubakar’s book. There was lust and passion but above all a clear-eyed exposition of what it means to be human and a woman and middle aged in Northern Nigeria riven not just by religion but by religious crises.

在 《非洲法语文学在国内的翻译》里,汪琳系统地分析 70 年代至今用中文出版的非洲文学作品。

Ethiopia opens its Chinese-built railway linking Addis Ababa to the Red Sea port city of Djibouti. It’s the first step in a 5,000km-long network of rail which Ethiopia hopes to build by 2020, connecting it to Kenya, Sudan and South Sudan.

Black Eunuchs of the Ottoman Empire, reviewed by William Armstrong. There was plenty of demand for eunuchs, and a steady supply was guaranteed by Arab horsemen raiding Africa. Most died during the castration process, driving up the price of those who survived. At their peak there may have been as many as 800 court eunuchs organized in a hierarchical, well-defined structure.

采访:恩古吉·瓦·提安哥,肯尼亚作家。他最早提倡用母语写作并以身作则。

Literary Hub proposes 25 New Books by African Writers You Should Read.

Almost two-thirds of 54,000 Africans polled consider China’s influence on Africa ispositive-african-views-of-china “somewhat” or “very positive”, according to AfroBarometer’s latest poll (free PDF summary here). At 24 percent, China is second only to the US (30 percent) as the most popular model for national development. China’s positive image is primarily based on its investments in infrastructure and low-cost of its products, while appreciation of the Chinese people, culture and language are negligible factors (2 percent).

The first online Kiswahili-Chinese Dictionary, Siwaxili, now features 14,000 entries. 想了解 “新编斯汉辞典”(在线版)背后的故事,请点这里

Authors attending South Africa’s Abantu Literary Festival in Soweto December 6-10, 2016.

Caixin on Guangzhou’s Chocolate City — Souring Business, Xenophobia Makes China Dream Lose Its Appeal for African Migrants

Alat Asem’s 《时间悄悄的嘴脸》: Guide to Related Links

 Alat Asem’s Zuilian

《时间悄悄的嘴脸》阿拉提·阿斯木 著

Author’s Background

阿拉提·阿斯木_百度百科

Literary Bio

Présentation: Alat Asem (en français)

Academic Papers

翟晓甜 张治安:阿拉提·阿斯木的超越与创新——读《时间悄悄的嘴脸》 

Renditions of the Novel

Chinese original: 《时间悄悄的嘴脸》 

Excerpt: Rechristening a High-rise (Chapter 19)

English translation underway by Bruce Humes and Jun Liu (publication date: Aug 2017)

Other Translations of Fiction by

Uyghur Author Alat Asem (غەيرەت ئاسىم)

Sidik Golden MobOff (斯迪克金子关机) 

The Only Real Man (最后的男人)

Interviews

Uyghur Writer Explores New Boundaries

阿拉提·阿斯木专访:地域化、全球化和双语写作

Speech

《时间悄悄的嘴脸》获颁第十一届 “骏马奖” 感言

African Themes at Frankfurt Book Fair 2016 (Oct 19-23)

Topic: From Africa to Europe: Refugees at the border in Melilla 

Date/venue: 15:00-16:00, Oct 20, Weltempfang Stage (Hall 3.1 L 25), Frankfurt Book Fair

Language: German/English

That the EU is watching its external borders is made clear by the border fence at Melilla, the Spanish city bordering on Morocco. Björn Kuhligk’s poem Die Sprache von Gibraltar (“The Language of Gibraltar”) examines the migration of people fleeing Africa. Kuhligk has done his research on the ground. He joins Flemish-Moroccan author Rachida Lamrabet, and Moroccan essayist Rachid Boutayeb to take a closer look at this bottleneck.

* * * * * *

Topic: How do artists, creative cultural professionals and academics from Africa view the future?

Date/venue: 12:00-13:00, Oct 23, Weltempfang Stage (Hall 3.1 L 25), Frankfurt Book Fair

Language:  German/English

Panel: Moderated by Sean O’Toole (art critic, co-publisher African Futures) with Lauren Beukes (South African writer), Smangele Mathebula (South African literary activist) and Angela Wachuka (head of Kwani Trust, curator of African Futures in Kenya)

September 2016: Altaic Storytelling Newsbriefs

Journalists in prison: Turkey "on track to surpass China" in 2016 says Financial Times

Journalists in prison: Turkey “on track to surpass China” in 2016 says Financial Times

Can Dündar, former editor-in-chief of Turkey’s Cumhuriyet newspaper, was arrested in late 2015 for publicizing the discovery of a covert arms shipment by the Turkish secret service to radical Islamist organisations fighting government forces in Syria. He was charged with espionage, aiding a terrorist organization, trying to topple the government and revealing state secrets. The newly launched We Are Arrested is Dündar’s account of the discovery, the weighing up of the pros and cons of publishing the news, and the events that unfolded after the decision.

Altaic Storytelling Quote of the Week: Let’s simply say I’m ‘from Turkey’

In a polished English accent, she began, “In my country,” but she paused, trying to reframe her sentence more academically. “You’re right,” she said instead. After giving this sign of acquiescence, sacred to all sane Oxfordites, she continued, “In my country, they grant the highest importance to the law that the height of minarets can’t exceed that of the government’s secular monuments. For this reason, in fact, they’ve built unbelievably ugly monuments to Atatürk all over Istanbul in recent years, just so they’ll overshadow the minarets of mosques that are hundreds of years old.”

Stevenson waited for the main course to arrive before emitting a short, quiet, acceptable chuckle.

Then he asked, “You’re Turkish, correct?”

“Let’s not say I’m Turkish,” Deniz said, smiling. “Let’s simply say I’m from Turkey.”

With glazed eyes, Stevenson combed the knowledge he had in his Turkey database. “Oh yes,” he said. “I believe Turkey, like Germany, is dealing with a national identity conflict. Am I mistaken?”

Deniz had discussed this with foreigners so many times that she’d memorized an overly simplified speech on the matter, which she’d titled “The Turkish Intellectual’s Problematization of Nationalism.” She recited it in a single breath, “You’re right. As a way of rejecting the nationalist strategies that appeared when the country was founded, and in reaction to the country’s destructive policies toward its various ethnic groups, Turkish intellectuals prefer to say they’re from Turkey rather than Turkish.”

(Excerpted from Banana Sounds, a translation of Ece Temelkuran’s Turkish novel, Muz Sesleri. The translation is by Deniz Perin.)

July-August 2016: Altaic Storytelling Newsbriefs

As the Red Carnation FadesCoup d’état Fiction: A Curiously Turkish Genre offers suggested reading for books that capture the Zeitgeist during the years that followed modern Turkey’s not infrequent periods of dictatorship.

The winners of the Junma Literary Awards for Ethnic Minority Writers (骏马奖) — handed out every three years since 1981 — were announced in early August. The competition is designed to promote writing by authors who belong to one of China’s non-Han peoples. A roundtable of five literary figures including Liu Daxian (刘大先), the editor of the quarterly民族文学研究 , discuss the winning titles in聚焦时代生活 彰显民族特色.  One trend: Emerging female writers such as Jin Malian (Hui), Xiao Mei (Naxi) and Tao Liqun (Zhuang). Tao wrote 母亲的岛 (陶丽群著) about the escape of a trafficked village woman.

《保安语汉语词典》, a Bonan-Chinese dictionary, has just been published by the authorities in Gansu’s Linxia City. The Bonan people (aka, Bao’an 保安族), now numbering around just 20,000, “are believed to be descended from Muslim Mongol soldiers stationed in Qinghai during the Yuan or Ming dynasties,” according to Wikipedia, and speak a Mongolic tongue. Since the language does not have its own script, the dictionary represents the sounds of Bonan in IPA and a proposed set of letters (保安语使用记音符号字母表 (方案)). In 2001, the city also published 《东乡语汉语词典》, a Dongxiang-Chinese dictionary. The Dongxiang speak a Mongolic language and number over 600,000, and are concentrated in the Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture, but also live in Ningxia, Qinghai and Xinjiang.

 

Chinese version of The Time Regulation InstituteAt long last, what is arguably Turkey’s most classic novel of the 20th century, Saatleri Ayarlama Enstitüsü, known in English as The Time Regulation Institute, has been published in Chinese. Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar’s satirical look at the effects of a social engineering project gone awry — as the Turkish authorities desperately instructed the public to ape the West while jettisoning its Ottoman culture — has been rendered by a German-based Chinese translator, Tan Lin, as 时间调校研究所 (谭琳译). Regrettably, the Chinese is based upon the German translation of Tanpınar’s original; indeed, there is a dearth of well trained Turkish-Chinese literary translators, though several of Orhan Pamuk’s novels have been translated from the Turkish for Horizon Books by the likes of Shen Zhixing (我的名字叫红,沈志兴译) and Chen Zhubing (我脑袋里的怪东西, 陈竹冰译).  时间调校研究所 joins a series of five Chinese renditions of contemporary Turkish novels (土耳其当代文学丛书) already published by Shanghai Literature and Art Publishing. They include novels by some of Turkey’s best known living writers, such as  Oya Baydar and Mario Levi (whose  Istanbul Was a Fairy Tale was also translated direct from the Turkish as 伊斯坦布尔是一个童话). And more good news: An additional four Chinese translations of Turkish novels will join the series in late 2016 or early 2017, according to a spokesperson for the publishing house. They are: The Dervish Gate by Ahmet Ümit; Hakan Günday’s The Few; Hakan Bıçakçı’s Dark Room, and Secrets Dreamed in Istanbul by Nermin Yıldırım. [Read more…]

Writing by Controversial Turkish Writer Coming Soon to China

Here, in French, but coming soon in Chinese

Here, en français, but coming soon in Chinese

Like any journalist worth her salt in today’s Turkey, Ece Temelkuran (伊切•泰玛尔库兰) was once fired for writing copy that the government of the day deemed politically incorrect. Her novels are edgy too, touching on sensitive social and political issues, and as a columnist and a novelist she has built up quite a following at home and abroad. While similarly provocative writing by the PRC’s homegrown authors is actively discouraged in the Xi Jinping Era, China’s publishers have apparently taken a liking to the outspoken Temelkuran, and three of her books are now being translated into Chinese.

Due out within 2016 is Ece Temelkuran’s The Sound of Bananas (香蕉的低语), while the tale of four women on the road from Tunisia to Lebanon, What Good is a Revolution If I Can’t Dance (Düğümlere Üfleyen Kadınlar, at left) – which reportedly sold 120,000 copies in Turkey — is scheduled for early 2017, both from Dookbook (读客图书). Horizon Books (世纪文景), which has a virtual monopoly over Orhan Pamuk’s novels in Chinese on the mainland, has purchased the rights to Temelkuran’s book-length essay exploring what it means to be Turkish, Turkey: The Insane and the Melancholy (Çılgın ve Hüzünlü). It is already out in Taiwan, entitled 我的祖國:憂鬱與瘋狂 , and will be published in the mainland as 我的祖国:土耳其的疯狂与忧愁. She is represented by Istanbul-based Kalem Agency.

In the China context, three books from a contemporary Turkish writer is quite something. Granted, none have hit the bookshelves yet, but when they do, she will join just a handful of authors with several of their books in Chinese, such as Orhan Pamuk, Elif Shafak and Ahmet Ümit.

In an insightful interview with Refinery29 conducted in Istanbul’s trendy Cihangir just a few days ago, Temelkuran tried to explain how she sees her role after the recent failed coup:

What are your hopes for Turkey in the coming weeks?

Maybe because of the things that I have been through I am not a big fan of the word hope. I am more into the word determination. My determination at the moment is to tell the story of Turkey from those people’s point of view who have been dismissed. My mother was imprisoned when she was a Leftist student in the 1971 coup and my father, as a young lawyer, rescued her from the hands of generals. This is the family I was born into. These are decent people, and the story of people like them has not been told. These are people who believed that there could have been a Turkey without political Islam, one with equal and dignified citizens. They dreamed of a country that could break away from the vicious cycle I have been talking about. Generations paid for this dream like in Iran, Iraq, Syria or Lebanon or even in Afghanistan. It is almost like Persepolis – over and over again. My dream right now is just to tell this story.

Junma Literary Prize: Winners of National Award for Writing by non-Han Authors

Uyghur mafiosa: Alat Asem takes us into the colorful world of Xinjiang's Uyghur jade traders

Uyghur mafioso: Alat Asem takes us into the colorful world of Xinjiang’s jade traders

The winners of the Junma Literary Awards for Ethnic Minority Writers (骏马奖)  — handed out every three years since 1981 — have just been announced. The competition is designed to promote writing by authors who belong to one of China’s non-Han peoples. Entries are permitted in all indigenous languages. Eight of the 24 winners were written in a minority language, and three were translated into Mandarin, one each from Mongolian, Tibetan and Uyghur.

Of particular interest — to me — is the award to Uyghur author Alat Asem for his novel, 《时间悄悄的嘴脸》(Zuilian). I am currently co-translating this book from the Chinese with Jun Liu.

 

 

第十一届(2012—2015)全国少数民族文学创作 “骏马奖” 获奖名单

长篇小说奖

 

《白虎寨》 李传锋(土家族)
《破荒》 袁仁琮(侗族)
《时间悄悄的嘴脸》 阿拉提·阿斯木(维吾尔族)
《信仰树》(蒙古文) 乌·宝音乌力吉(蒙古族)
《昨天的部落》(藏文) 旦巴亚尔杰(藏族)

 

For full list that includes award-winning novels, short stories, reportage, poetry, essays, and translation, see 骏马奖.