Aug 10-11 Hailar Event: 3rd Annual Tungusic Language and Culture Conference

第三届通古斯语言文化国际学术研讨会

Date: August 10-11, 2015

Venue: Hailar District, Hulunbuir, Inner Mongolia

Organizer/Sponsors: CASS Institute of Ethnic Literature, Hulunbuir College, Hulunbuir Institute of History and Culture Research

Topics: History, culture, religious beliefs, literature, folk arts and socio-economic status of Tungusic peoples: within the PRC (Hezhen, Evenki, Oroqen, Manchu and Xibe); in Russia’s Far East and Siberia; in Mongolia (Tsaatan); in Japan (Ainu); and the interaction of Tungusic peoples with other peoples of northeast Asia, such as the Mongols, those of Turkic origins, Nordic Sami, Koreans and Japanese.  

Call for papers: contact hyao2013@163.com or yulan_003@163.com

One of the key personalities on the organizing committee is Dr. Chao Ke (Dulor Osor Chog), a renowned Evenki scholar who has written widely on Tungusic culture and language. See here for details on his latest published works.

Hong Kong and Cambridge Events: Spotlight on the Tungus-speaking Orochen and Evenki

Event: The Orochen – China’s Last Nomadic Hunters, a Royal Geographical Society presentation by Sih Hing Chao (founder of the Orochen Foundation)

Venue: 1/F The Hong Kong Club, 1 Jackson Road, Central, Hong Kong

Time/date: June 16, Drinks Reception 6.30 pm; Lecture 7.30 pm

Reservations/info: events@rgshk.org.hk (HK$150 for RGS members, HK$200 for non-members)

The Orochen [鄂伦春] first entered Chinese historic annals during Emperor Kangxi’s reign as reindeer herders, but gradually gave up the reindeer for the horse. Over time, they developed a nomadic horse-breeding hunter-gatherer culture highly specialised in the hunting of various deer species prevalent in the Khingan Mountains.

During the Qing dynasty, the Orochen played a significant role in the Manchu imperial military forces, as part of the “all-conquering” Solon Eight Banners [索伦八旗], which consisted of a number of horse-based ethnic groups. The Solon Banners fought in campaigns as far-flung across Asia as Nepal, Sichuan, Korea and Vietnam, providing the finest cavalry for the imperial troops. 

 

Event: River Stars Reindeer, exhibition of photos of the Evenki and Orochen communities in the early 20th century

Venue: Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Time/date: June 23 to September 27, 2015

Previously unseen photographs capturing life in a remote corner of the world a hundred years ago will be displayed for the first time as part of  “River Stars Reindeer” at the Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

A shaman, a shamaness, and a Achinsk Lama with their helpers (photo by Sergei Shirokogoroff)

A shaman, a shamaness, and a Achinsk Lama with their helpers (photo by Sergei Shirokogoroff)

 

The photographs record the indigenous Evenki [鄂温克] and Orochen [鄂伦春] communities and were made by Russian ethnographer Sergei Shirokogoroff and his wife Elizabeth between 1912-1917, and by Cambridge graduate Ethel Lindgren and her husband, Oscar Mamen, between 1929-1932.