Quote of the Week: Alexander Dawe on Translating Turkey’s Tanpınar

‘Learn the original language before you try recasting it in another,’ they might rightly say. ‘And then you won’t make so many mistakes.’ And I certainly made my share of those. But is it not through reformulation, trial and error, constant digging that we begin to reach some kind of higher ground? Is translation not a vision of the perfect conversation. One that is always rising. In which both sides truly listen, one person not only working to save the other, win an argument, swim faster, gain ground; it is a calm and balanced sense of the immediate moment that makes for a more sublime transfer of ideas, a shared idiom, a spirited common language; it is a beautiful balloon kept up in air by two friends tapping it gently back and forth.

(Alexander Dawe, excerpted from Lost and Found: A Few Words on Translating Tanpinar, Bosphorus Review of Books)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] Quote of the Week: Travels of a Linguistic Nomad

My attachment to my mother tongue is emotional; my attachment to English is cerebral. I feel like I need both to balance myself. Over time, I have also realized that if there is melancholy, longing, sadness in my writing, I find it easier to express these in Turkish.

But when it comes to irony, satire, sarkiness, I find it easier in English.  The word “irony” does not even exist in Turkish.

(Elif Şafak in Travels of a Linguistic Nomad)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] Quote of the Week: Fear & Loathing in Xinjiang

…what we are witnessing in the XUAR is a new form of ethnic cleansing that draws from all of these mass atrocities of the past while benefiting from the technologies of control available to states in the 21st century. It is a form of ethnic cleansing where the object of purging is not physical territory, but the human terrain of the ethnic group itself. Whereas ethnic cleansing during the breakup of Yugoslavia sought to cleanse a territory of other ethnicities in Xinjiang, the Chinese state appears to be trying to cleanse Uighurs of their “Uighurness.” A recent document on China’s state policy in the XUAR makes these intentions clear, noting that the goal with regards to the Uighurs is to “break their lineage, break their roots, break their connections, and break their origins.”

(Excerpted from Fear and Loathing in Xinjiang: Ethnic Cleansing in the 21st Century, by Sean R. Roberts. He is an associate professor of the practice of international affairs at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] Quote of the Week: Culture doesn’t just live in museums

Lagos is judged [by Economist Intelligence Unit’s index] one of the 10 least liveable cities in the world, and London comes much higher in the desirability rankings, at number 48…In the culture and environment category, which

From Nigerian illustrator William Chechet’s “We are the North”

 

includes recreational activities, Vienna scored 96.3 out of 100 and Lagos just 53.5. Now I’ve been to Vienna, and I’ve lived in Lagos, and there is no way Vienna is 43 points ahead of Lagos in culture and environment. Just ask Emmanuel Macron, who recently made a pilgrimage to Fela Kuti’s New Afrika Shrine in Lagos. Lagos is a city of galleries under bridges, where artists paint and display for free. It’s a city of owambe parties that last until dawn. Every weekend there is a royal wedding that shuts down roads and stops traffic. Lagos is a city of fashion, home to the third biggest film industry in the world, and its Afrobeat music pulses out to reach the ears of a global audience. It’s obvious the statisticians didn’t know where to look.

(Excerpted from Who says the most liveable city is in the west? Culture doesn’t just live in museums by Chibundu Onuzo)

Quote of the Week (End July 2018): Arundhati Roy on Slow-cooking Language

For me, or for most contemporary writers working in these parts,                                   language can never be a given.                                                                                     It has to be made. It has to be cooked. Slow-cooked.

(Exerpted from Arundhati Roy’s 2018 W. G. Sebald Lecture on Literary Translation, What is the Morally Appropriate Language in Which to Think and Write?)

Altaic Storytelling Quote of the Week: Culture as “backroom bric-à-brac”

 . . . of course, the Chinese government enforcing Chinese as the language of the whole empire is based on the premise that if these unruly people can be acculturated, they can become part of the larger whole. When they check in at the door, their culture (like the Kyrgyz Epic of Manas) is denatured and assigned to one of China’s many back rooms as part of the general bric-à-brac. The Mongols, the Manchus, and others brought their own culture into China, but once they lost control their culture was also assigned to the bric-à-brac and the old Han culture was put back in pride of place, purified as much as possible to maintain the idea that the civilisation is still grounded in those ancient ancestors.

(From a correspondent who wishes to maintain anonymity)

Altaic Storytelling Quote of the Week: Translation and the Looking Glass

It [translating] teaches the writer how to write in a way that nothing else can because you are inside of something. You’re not outside of it anymore. One can read something so closely that it’s only by translating it that you really do feel you’ve gone through the looking glass, that you are on the other side and you’re in that other world. I would wish that pleasure and education and marveling — that sense of amazement — for any writer.

(Excerpted from Why Jhumpa Lahiri loves translating Italy’s ‘finest living writer’)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] Quote of the Week: Patrice Nganang on African Writers’ Focus on Life Overseas

Ngum Ngafor: As an artist, you follow in the footsteps of writers like Bate Besong and Mongo Beti to critique political and social issues. How urgent is it for today’s Cameroonian creative to be society’s conscience?

Patrice Nganang: It is more than urgent, particularly because Africa has had a very long disconnect between its younger writers and the countries of their birth. The culture of [focusing on] US or Europe-based African writers who are trained in creative writing has effectively curtailed the politicisation of writers. And this at a moment, when battles are so urgent on the continent. Just look at the landscape of homophobia, tyranny and poverty! People are sold as slaves in front of our very eyes – in Africa! It is amazing to see how the continent has sunk to a level of sheer public criminality, while writers are most of the time busy writing about the plight of their lives in Western capitals and how cool they are. It is truly amazing to see the number of voices that are silenced on the continent, as writers talk about their travails in Western metropolises that were built by people who showed courage in adversity and sometimes even in wars. Some soul searching is necessary for African writers, particularly the younger ones.

(Excerpted from interview, Out of the Chamber of Death: Conversation with Patrice Nganang)

Altaic Storytelling Quote of the Week: President Erdoğan, “Vous n’êtes pas en terre conquise”

L’histoire se rappellera des morts et prisonniers en Turquie, de la mise sous califat de ce beau pays, de vos purges et détournements, de vos avions de guerre et palais de justice selon votre justice. Des choses indignes de notre mémoire en Algérie. Il fallait vous le dire pour que vous ne reveniez pas chez nous en conquérant ottoman, en Barberousse libérateur. L’histoire des pirates qui se font passer pour des sauveurs nous la connaissons. Trop bien.

Nous rêvons d’une nation forte, libre, puissante, médiane et heureuse de ses racines et de ses récoltes. Acceptant les différences, la foi et la révolte, la religion comme choix, l’espoir comme devoir, la pluralité comme droit, le bonheur comme but.

Nous avons besoin d’amis et d’alliés aux mains qui ne soient pas tachées de sang. Votre ruse n’a pas chemin chez nous. Et vos agents ici n’ont pas de lendemain.

Vous n’êtes pas en terre conquise. Comme vos ancêtres qui nous ont colonisés, vous ne prendrez pas racine ici. Seulement une illusion de conquête. Comme tous les colons.

(Excerpted from Lettre ouverte à Erdogan as Turkey’s President Erdoğan begins tour of Algeria, Mauritania, Senegal and Mali. Authored by Algerian writer and columnist Kamel Daoud)

非漂 [Fēi Piāo] 本周精彩语录: 论四川话

Sichuan hua (四川话) sounds like a

remote mountain primate attempting rap-opera

(As uttered by rock musician and peripatetic travel writer 小飞, aka Thomas Bird)