Update: Investigative Journalism in China

The Global Investigative Journalism Network reports:

A recent study by Sun Yat-Sen University’s School of Communication found that the number of China’s investigative journalists has declined by more than half since 2011, and that a majority of those who remain say they intend to change careers. Researchers found that the number of investigative journalists in China plummeted by 57.5 percent over the last six years. The reasons cited: low pay and poor chances for promotion. Add to that widespread censorship and official interference with news media, and it’s not hard to understand the difficult plight of China’s investigative journalists.

Suggested reading:

The Best Investigative Stories from China — 2017

  • Includes English summary and links to Chinese originals for stories on these topics: The Death of an Autistic Teenager; Killing the Debt Collector; Pharmaceutical Financial Fraud; Nanny Arson Case; Mortgaging Housing for Pensions; The Death of Li Wenxing; Shanghai Day Care Center Child Abuse; Abuse at Gaming Addiction Center; Investigations into LeEco; Child Abuse at RYB Kindergarten; Hunan’s Mining Pollution; Secret Network of Longwei Culture and Media; The “Invisible” Ma Ruixia.

Investigative journalists cite low pay, lack of inspiration for quitting

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